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Let’s face it. Romania is a flaming train wreck of a country, and there’s no better proof of it than the annual MCV/CVM report put out by the European Union.

The latest one was published this week, and you can read it for yourself in one of four languages at the link above, but there’s no real need.

It’s full of choice quotes like this:

The Commission has had to raise rule of law-related concerns a number of times, specifically voicing concerns on backtracking from the progress made in previous years.

For much of this period, there was little or no willingness on the part of Romanian authorities to engage with the additional recommendations of November 2018 – or indeed with recommendations issued by the Venice Commission and the Council of Europe’s Group of States against Corruption.

In just about every aspect of judicial reform and the fight against corruption, Romania is failing. Which is the same old story as always.

This despite the fact that the Dancila government secretly sent a bunch of PSD hacks to Brussels earlier this year to try to pressure the CVM committee.

But, of course, Ana Birchall, the current Minister of “Justice,” thinks that the latest CVM report vindicates Romania:

Birchall said that the [CVM] report praises the government for its efforts, especially the steps taken after she became the Minister of Justice, and also has many positive things to say about the government and Prime Minister Viorica Dancila.

Bonkers…

Never Having to Say Sari

Totally unrelated, but this is the perfect opportunity for me to show you how much Ana Birchall loves getting dressed up in a sari.

Death to All Muslims League meeting in Bucharest, 2018

Sadly, she wears normal clothes when she meets African strongmen, Arab dictators, and other scumbags who hate democracy.

Rinse, Lather, Repeat

The CVM process has been going on for 12 fucking years, and Romania is quite literally no different in 2019 than it was in 2007.

Here’s a quote from that first 2007 CVM report:

The Romanian Government is committed to judicial reform and cleansing the system of corruption. There is still a clear weakness in translating these intentions into results.

In addition, the structural changes which are needed impact on the society at large and require a step change which goes much beyond the mere fulfillment of the benchmarks. This requires a strong long term commitment by Romania and can only be successful if the strict separation of the executive, legislative and judicial power is respected and if stable political conditions and commitment are in place.

And now from the 2019 report:

Fundamental rules of the functioning of key State institutions are changed too quickly and too often, without preparation and consultations, which raises legitimate questions about the soundness of the outcomes and of the real motives behind some of those changes. This practice weakens external checks on the Government, it is contrary to the principle of separation of powers.

Sigh…

Nobody Really Cares

The CVM was (laughably, now, looking back at it) supposed to be a temporary measure in order to get Romania up to speed in terms of tackling corruption and implementing a fair and equitable justice system.

But don’t let the “strong language” in the CVM report this year (or from any year) concern you. The EU has not and will never censor, fine, or punish Romania in any way for their flagrantly criminal behavior.

You can tell how little the EU cares by the very fact that each year’s CVM report is written in worse English than the one before.

Here’s a few authentic quotes from this year’s report:

…while she was a candidate to be European Public Prosecutor…

…prosecution of members or former members of the Government who are member of the Chamber of Deputies…

…This is positive example of where consideration of good practice in other Member States and beyond has helped…

There are many more like this, but, frankly, I’m not sitting in Brussels getting paid 50 euros an hour to write this shit.

Oh well. Better luck next year, Romania!

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