Word of the Day: Thank Ya Very Much


You know sometimes I forget that some of my readers are at the very first rung of the ladder in terms of understanding Romania and the Romanian language. I had someone ask me the other day about an extremely common phrase. Time to cover the basics!

When saying “thank you” the common way to say it (which applies to most situations) in Romanian is multumesc (mooltzew mesk) but the reader’s question was “What does multumesc frumos mean?” The answer, quite simply, is “thank you very much”. Literally however frumos means “nice” or “beautiful”.

But it got me to thinking, as is my wont and common practice, and I realized that in absolutely none of the other languages I know is this the case. That is to say, whether English or Spanish (muchas gracias) or Italian (molto grazie), French (merci beaucoup) or even Russian (Большое спасибо) the emphasis is on quantity. As in “regular” thank you and then a “big/large” thank you. Only in Romanian is it beautifully or nicely thanking someone as the literal translation.

Hang on a darn second, that isn’t true and I realized it about a day later. “Thank you” in Hungarian is köszönöm (roughly kesenem) but “thank you very much” is köszönöm szépen (roughly se-pen). Aha! In case you haven’t guessed, the root “szep” in Hungarian means “beautiful” or “nice” and is just about identical to Romanian frumos. Beautiful :)

AND NOW YOU KNOW!

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Categorised in: Hungarian language, Romanian language, Word of the Day

5 Responses »

  1. German is another one that uses “beautiful”(danke schön). In Romanian you could also use the ” mulţumesc mult” (thank you much) emphasizing quantity or the ultimate: mulţumesc mult de tot.(thank you much for everything).

  2. Yes, German uses both the “beautiful” (Danke schön) and the “much” (Vielen Dank) version.

  3. there’s ‘thanking you kindly’ in english.

  4. well, in polish we say “dziękuję BARDZO” [thank you VERY MUCH] and “PIĘKNIE dziękuje” [thanking BEAUTIFULLY ^^]
    So maybe it’s characteristic for slavic languages in general :)

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